Photography Tips: How to Hold a Camera and Operate the Shutter Release for Better Pictures

How to Hold a Camera and Operate the Shutter Release for Better Pictures
Photography Tips: How to Hold a Camera and Operate the Shutter Release for Better Pictures

Camera shake is a cause of un-sharp photos. Most people who take pictures do not want blurred photos. By using certain techniques, equipment and devices, people can prevent camera shake. This article discusses six ways to remove camera shake from picture-taking.

1. Stand firm. Find a comfortable yet firm pose. Standing with a very slight bend in the knees is more effective than standing with locked knees.

2. Use both hands. To take a horizontal photo using a pocket-sized camera, rest the bottom of the camera in the palm of the left hand. Rest the thumb of the right hand comfortably on the back of the camera. Place the forefinger of the right hand on or near the shutter release button.

To take a vertical shot using a pocket-sized camera, grip the right side of the camera with the right hand with the thumb on the back of the camera. Turn the camera to the vertical position. Place the forefinger on the right edge of the camera on or near the shutter release button. Use the left hand to keep the camera level and steady by placing the thumb under the camera base and the forefinger on top of the camera.

To take a horizontal photo with a full-sized camera, grip the right side of the camera with the right hand and rest the camera base in the palm of the left hand. Place the thumb of the right hand on the back of the camera. Wrap the palm of the right hand around the right side of the camera and place the forefinger over the shutter release button. Support the bottom of a telephoto or zoom lens with the thumb and finger of the left hand.

To take a vertical photo with a full-sized camera, grip the right side of the camera with the right hand and turn the camera to the vertical position. Let the bottom of the camera hang over/rest on the palm of the right hand with the thumb placed on the back of the camera. Place the forefinger over the shutter release button. Support the bottom of a telephoto or zoom lens with the thumb and forefinger of the left hand.

3. Use the viewfinder if the camera has one. Look through the viewfinder rather than at the LCD monitor to take the shot because it is easier to keep the arms close to the body when looking through the viewfinder. There is less camera movement if the arms are held close to the body.

4. Breathe and release the shutter. Just before pressing the shutter release button, breathe normally and near the end of exhaling, gently release the shutter button. Avoid jabbing it. And do not be too quick to take the finger off the button after taking the photo.

5. Use a helpful feature or accessory. The self-timer on a camera may help to reduce camera shake. Also, mounting a camera on a tripod or monopod reduces camera shake. The self-timer is most effective when used with a tripod. A tripod is steadier than a monopod, but since a tripod can interfere with people moving in a crowded area, a monopod is an alternative to the tripod. However, for a monopod to produce good results, the photographer must practice using it.

6. Use a cable release. People who use a tripod can attach a cable shutter release to the camera. One type of cable release is the remote shutter release that operates electronically. The photographer releases the shutter while within the operating distance designated by the manufacturer of the cable release. For some cameras, non-electronic cable releases are available. When one is attached to the camera, the picture-taker operates it while standing within the distance that the cable extends. When ready to take the photo, the photographer presses the button at the end of the cable to trip the shutter.

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